Felicia Browne Project

After completing our research we have developed some initial ideas.

The initial ideas from both myself and Megan included creating a montage, breaking apart a traditional poster, and combining a series of images and type in order to convey a narrative and celebrate Felicia Browne as a hero. We thought of having one panel dedicated to type, perhaps through letterpress? Another of a portrait of Felicia Browne herself, drawn in the style of her sketches. A repeat pattern print of the train, as that was such a crucial element within the story leading to her death and we were not sure of what to create for the final panel. Lente suggested creating an illustration (again in the style of Felicia Browne’s sketches) and slowly transforming it into a real image in order to gain a sense of realism. This also demonstrates that this was not simply a story but something that really did take place.

So far as a group I think that we have not been consistent due to the number of disruptions taking place. This includes team members not turning up or turning up late without having done any preparation work prior to attending, causing myself, Megan and Lente to re-explain our concept several times.

Nevertheless, we have decided to go and create some visual work to gain a sense of how everything could work. We have each given each other tasks to create the various elements of the montage.

Myself and Megan worked on the typographic piece through experimenting with letterpress.

Here was the outcome. Although the word is not extremely clear, I do like the texture of the print. I do think that the word needs a little editing to refine and legislate the word in order to make it stand out more.


 

Development:

In regards to the type myself and Megan decided to play with the type to see what we could create, above is my outcome. The image on the left is much stronger as there is a stronger contrast between the background and type.

The group remained in contact through a whats app group, whereby we shared our work to and gave our opinions. I felt this was an effective way to communicate as we were unable to meet often.

Above are examples of the work created by the group, except for two members who did not turn up at all during the project. Looking at it here I think that the pieces do seem disjointed and there is not much of a collaborative sense occurring.

This was also highlighted with our tutorial with David. He said that he was unsure of how the work could fit together and it seemed to look as if everyone had gone off and done their own piece without there being much collaboration involved. Taking on board his feedback we sat down and reflected on the work.

We realised that the only way we could move forward and join the elements to make a coherent piece was through getting them altogether and working out how they would fit in the space. We therefore took an area in the studio and started piecing everything together.

Using the whiteboard was a good idea because it allowed us to draw boxes around some of the pieces to see where the others would sit and roughly what size we wanted them. In regards to creating consistency throughout it all we used black mount board – the same as what the train was screen printed onto – to make a stronger visual impact. We experimented with numerous layouts to see which way would look stronger and convey the narrative the best.

We then tried to work out where to display it ready for the presentation. Here are trials of ways it could potentially sit. I particularly like the lightbox because it helps to illuminate the work, emphasising the idea of celebrating Felicia Browne as a hero. It also helps to create a platform for the laptop containing the animation to sit.

In regards to hierarchy and negative space, we were unhappy with the two above layouts, forcing us to try again.

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This is the third layout we tried and the one we felt worked the best. With it moving gradually from left to right it gives a sense of movement and life. As well as celebrating Felicia Browne as the hero she is rightly known for, we wanted to convey a sense of journey, a journey of her life. This has slightly changed from the original concept, with the design also having changed from the original illustration. Despite the change I do feel it works well, I wonder what it might have been like had we stuck to the original plan, but due to the style of the train print – there is a real strength to it.

Overall, I do think that the pieces work well together. I think that the black mount board and limited colour scheme tie them altogether. A number of processes have been explored and I feel that myself, Megan, Lente, George and Samantha have all contributed well. It is unfortunate that not all team members contributed, some very little and some none at all. But I do believe the remaining members, including myself, overcame this challenge. As a group I do think that at the beginning we were a little disjointed with communications being sparse and there wasn’t a sense of collaboration. However, towards the end of the project I think that we all came together well. Once all the pieces had been completed and collected, we worked together to edit the pieces and see how they would come together as a final display. We worked together to edit the layout and bounced ideas off one another. Despite this happened towards the end of the project, it made me realise how a catalyst, no matter how small can really make an impact and difference within a group.

To improve however, I do think that we did not explore enough ideas at the beginning and rushed into one a little too quickly, potentially missing out on key opportunities. Moving forward I would try to explore more ideas and see how many ways a message can be communicated. How far can an idea be pulled and stretched?

 

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Author: marislathamgraphics

I am a student at Cardiff Metropolitan University studying BA Hons Graphic Communication.

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